April 8, 2016

Programme

Day 1 (19 October 2018, Friday)

0830-0900 Registration
0900-1030 Workshop 1 Workplace Stress: Consequences and Management
Professor Hector W.H. Tsang
Napier, Level 6
Workshop 2 Participation in Context: What Occupational Therapists Need to Know about Participation as a Civil Right and an Area for OT Assessment and Intervention
Professor Joy Hammel & Ms Robin Ann Jones
Read, Level 6
Workshop 3 Assistive Technology (AT): Considerations for Assessment and Implementation Process for Persons with Disabilities in Singapore
Mr Tan Chuan Hoh, Ms Chia Rui Min & Ms Siti Juliana Binte Mohamed Ruslan Hadi
Spottiswoode, Level 6
1030-1100 Tea Break
1100-1230 Workshop 1(continued) Workshop 2(continued) Workshop 3(continued)
1230-1400 Lunch
1400-1530 Workshop 1(continued) Workshop 2(continued) Workshop 3(continued)
1530-1600 Tea Break
1600-1730 Workshop 1(continued) Workshop 2(continued) Workshop 3(continued)

Day 2 (20 October 2018, Saturday)
Conference Programme Outline (subjected to change)

0800-0830 Registration
0830-0840 Welcome AddressMs Ngooi Bi Xia
President, Singapore Association Of Occupational Therapists
0840-0900 Opening AddressGuest of Honour: Mdm Rahayu Mahzam
Member of Parliament, Jurong GRC
0900-1000 Keynote LecturePromoting Inclusion and Integration for People with Disabilities and Ethnic Diversities
Professor Hector W.H. Tsang
1000-1030 Tea Break
1030-1200 Insight ChatIntegration of Patient Care: Perspectives from Service User and Occupational Therapists
Mr Lee Yong Jie, Ms Wu Xiao Yuan & Ms Sharifah Rawiah Binte Matnor
Facilitator: Ms Tan Wan Ru
1200-1300 Lunch
1300-1430 Concurrent Sessions: Paper Presentations Seminar
Session 1Enabling Participation: Hospital to Community I
Facilitator: Ms Fiona Lim
Ballroom 1, Level 6

  1. Benefits of Occupational Therapy Activity-Based Group Therapy in an Acute Psychiatric Ward: Patients’ Perspectives
    Vanessa Koh Shi Yin – National University Hospital, Singapore
  2. The Use of Mobile Horticulture to Improve Engagement and Well-Being of Geriatric Patients in Acute Hospital Wards
    Giang Thuy Anh – Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore
  3. Increasing Patients’ Engagement in Activities of Daily Living in the Ward of a Community Hospital
    Tan Choon Kiat Galvin – St Andrew’s Community Hospital, Singapore
  4. Importance of Occupational Engagements in Occupational Therapy Lead Palliative Group Therapy
    Nurul Ain Binte Rahmat – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  5. Facilitating Self-Care after Total Knee Replacement: An Occupational Therapy (OT) – Nursing Initiative
    Tok Xue Hui – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  6. Daily Activities and Participation: Perspectives of Persons with Lower-Limb Amputation in Singapore
    Nani Adilla Zailani – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
Session 2Work & Occupations I
Facilitator: Ms Millicent Poh
Spottiswoode, Level 6

  1. Case Report : Client-Centred Partnership Enabling Continuum of Care and Early Return-To-Work
    Cheng Shuet Fong – Abilities Beyond Limitations and Expectations, Singapore
  2. Facilitating Return-To-Work for Young Patients with Cognitive Impairment: A Case Study
    Toh Ee Lin Shannon – National University Hospital, Singapore
  3. Preliminary Outcomes of Return-To-Work Programme in an Occupational Therapy Department
    Lum Wei Peng – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  4. Factors Influencing Return to Work Outcomes among Migrant Workers in Singapore
    Tang Li Wen – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  5. Investigating Relationship between Work Readiness and Employability of Persons with Physical Disabilities
    Teng Mei Ling – SPD, Singapore
  6. Stressors Faced and Coping Strategies Used by Occupational Therapists under Conditional Registration
    Chan Chi Teng and Neo Yun – Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore
Session 3Across Lifespan I
Facilitator: Mr Gabriel Kwek
Read, Level 6

  1. Occupational Therapy in School Settings: Learning from Singapore and the United Kingdom
    Karina Dancza and Corrine Hoo – Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore
  2. A Scoping Review of Parent Focused Interventions for Families of Children with Sensory Processing and Integration Challenges
    Susan Allen – Kaleidoscope Therapy Centre, Singapore
  3. Impact of Specialised Seating on Children with Special Needs and Their Families: Caregiver’s Perspective
    Nur Sakinah Adam and Siti Juliana Binte Mohamed Ruslan Hadi – Cerebral Palsy Alliance Singapore, Singapore
  4. Primary School Teachers’ Expectations of Handwriting Skills in Primary School Children
    Ong Li Hui – KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore
  5. Outcomes of a Mindfulness Group for Children in an Outpatient Setting
    Ho Shu-Jun – KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore
  6. The Penang Phenomenon – Perspectives of Stakeholders of a Role-Emerging Clinical Education Placement
    Danielle Cheong and Tan Pei Shan – Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore
Session 4Getting the Most from Sensory Profile
Ms Melinda Cooper
Facilitator: Ms Jessica Hooi
Napier, Level 6
1430-1445 Coffee Break
1445-1600 Concurrent Sessions: Paper Presentations Seminar
Session 5Enabling Participation: Hospital to Community II
Facilitator: Ms Goh Pei Qi
Ballroom 1, Level 6

  1. Exploring the Biomechanical Demands of a Mopping Task in Singapore
    Yang Zixian – Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
  2. Piloting an Occupation-Focused Frailty Management Programme for Community-Living Older Adults in Singapore
    Tim Xu Tianma – Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore
  3. Occupational Engagement Experience and Benefits of Altruistic Group Activity among Community-Dwelling Elderly
    Crystal Yee Ying Jie and Yuen Ru Ying – Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore
  4. Recruitment and Retention of Volunteers in Disability Sport Programmes in Singapore
    Mah Looi Han and Chew Shi Yi – Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore
  5. Social Participation and Navigation (SPAN) Website and Web-Application: A Feasibility Study
    Tan Xianghong – KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore
Session 6Work & Occupations II
Facilitator: Mr Lin Sijie
Spottiswoode, Level 6

  1. Off-Road versus On-Road Assessment of Older Taxi Drivers Aged ≥ 70 Years
    Chan Mei Leng – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  2. An Event-Related Potential Study to Investigate Risky Decision Making among Taxi Drivers
    Andy Cheng Shu-kei – The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong S.A.R., China
  3. Comparison between Custom-Made Splint and Commercial Brace for Distal Radius Fractures: A Randomised Controlled Trial
    Wong Mei Xue – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  4. Development of a Novel Assessment of Unilateral Spatial Neglect Post-Stroke: Preliminary Findings
    Yetta Chan Wai Yin – Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
  5. Application of Cognitive Functional Evaluation (CFE) Framework to Clinical Practice
    Yap Li Wen – Physical Rehab Special Interest Group
Session 7Across Lifespan II
Facilitator: Ms Tan Wan Ru
Read, Level 6

  1. Extended Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and Its Effects on Cognitive Function and Quality of Life in Patients with Mild to Moderate Dementia
    Yong Huiting and Gabriela Oliveira – New York University, United States
  2. Medication Training Programme for Single Elderly: Collaboration between Occupational Therapists and Pharmacists
    Tong Jun Bin and Ng Yuan Hui – Bright Vision Hospital, Singapore
  3. Adherence to Home Modifications for Fall Prevention in Older Adults
    Carly Wong – Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  4. Exploring the Usefulness of a Family-Oriented Intervention on Grieving Process: A Pilot Study
    Lim Bing Quan, Max – Alexandra Campus, Singapore
  5. Occupational Therapists in Palliative Care (PC): Demographics, Challenges and Rewards
    Chong Tjia-Yih Judith and Tze Wei Ping – Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore
Session 4
(continued)
1600-1630 Tea Break
1630-1730 Plenary LectureResponding to the Global Call from People with Disabilities to Deliver Participation-Focused Services and Supports in the Community: The Role of Occupational Therapy
Professor Joy Hammel
1730-1745 Closing Speech & Award PresentationMs Sharon Toh
Chairperson, Scientific Committee, NOTC 2018
Poster Presentations
  1. Multifaceted Ergonomic Interventions to Reduce Musculoskeletal Injuries in Nurses: A Scoping Review
    Pang Liying – National University Hospital, Singapore
    Tan Xianghong – KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore
  2. Psychological Distress Mediated Relationship between Stigma and Life Quality among Heroin Users
    Lin Chung-Ying – The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong S.A.R., China
  3. Does Video-Based Training Improve Inter-Rater Reliability in Scoring the Modified Barthel Index?
    Tan Weiying Amelia – Jurong Community Hospital, Singapore
  4. Predischarge Planning Group for Patients in the Rehabilitation Wards
    Jolyn Tian Shiya – St Andrew’s Community Hospital, Singapore

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keynote Lecture

Promoting Inclusion and Integration for People with Disabilities and Ethnic Diversities
Speaker: Professor Hector W.H. Tsang
20 October 2018, Saturday

Stereotype, prejudice, and stigmatisation towards individuals with disabilities are well known to be devastating which results in discrimination. This discrimination will create hurdle which may block their road to function independently in the community. The keynote presentation will review a theoretical model on stigmatisation and discrimination and illustrate this with research on people with psychiatric disabilities. The presentation will give an account to evidenced-based strategies on promoting inclusion and integration so that people with disabilities will stay in harmony with in society. In Hong Kong, there has been a substantial population with diversified ethnicities from South Asia. Their children have experienced great challenges in learning Chinese as their second language. The difficulties in language translate to their barriers in education, employment, and interpersonal relationship when they reach adolescence and adulthood. This lecture will present the pioneering attempt to apply principles of social inclusion and occupational therapy techniques such as cognitive behavioral approach and social skills training to help these ethnic minority children learn Chinese and thus be integrated into the mainstream culture in Hong Kong.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Plenary Lecture

Responding to the Global Call from People with Disabilities to Deliver Participation-Focused Services and Supports in the Community: The Role of Occupational Therapy
Speaker: Professor Joy Hammel
20 October 2018, Saturday

Full participation in society is a global right for people with disabilities, yet many continue to face significant participation disparities; that is, they do not experience equitable participation opportunities when compared to people without disabilities. People with disabilities also report that participation has not been adequately focused on in rehabilitation, including by occupational therapists who could be in a position to support this equitable participation given our theory base focused on the intersect of person, environment and occupation. At the same time, there is a growing body of research that brings this disability community voice to the forefront, and offers evidence to support participation-focused assessments and interventions and their impact on physical and emotional health, activity performance, and everyday participation. This keynote will highlight how people with disabilities are defining participation and what it means to them within the context of international civil rights, and promising practice and action research strategies for delivering participation-focused interventions in the community.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Workshop Synopses

Workshop 1 Workplace Stress: Consequences and Management
Presenter: Professor Hector W.H. Tsang
19 October 2018, Friday

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the sources of workplace stress and the physiological, psychological, and behavioural consequences
  2. Understand the role of mediators in the manifestation of stress
  3. Understand the impact of workplace stress on physical and psychosocial health
  4. List and describe various kinds of diseases that may be related to workplace stress
  5. Understand the epidemiology of workplace stress
  6. Describe the role of occupational therapists in helping clients with health problems related to workplace stress
  7. Understand the theories and be able to implement the basic techniques of the following stress management methods
    • Abdominal breathing
    • Imagery and visualization
    • Progressive muscle relaxation
    • Body scan
    • Cognitive-behavioural approach

Educational Approach:
The workshop will employ various teaching and learning strategies including: lecture, small and large group discussion, demonstration, and practical sessions.

Practice Implications:
Workplace stress affects everyone, including occupational therapists (OTs) and clients. The workshop will deliver both theoretical knowledge and practical skills about workplace stress and its management. These skills can be utilised by OTs to self-manage their own stress and thus preventing burnout. It can also be used by OTs in various settings (e.g. vocational rehabilitation, hand therapy, mental health) when working with clients to facilitate return to work or maintain optimal job performance. With this background, occupational therapists can make further advancement in this area and develop stress management programmes to address the diverse needs of clients in Singapore and elsewhere in the world.


 

 

 

 

 

 
Workshop 2 Participation in Context: What Occupational Therapists Need to Know about Participation as a Civil Right and an Area for OT Assessment and Intervention
Presenter: Professor Joy Hammel & Ms Robin Ann Jones
19 October 2018, Friday

Full participation in society is not only an important outcome of occupational therapy, but also a civil right that people with disabilities have fought for globally. However, research has shown that occupational therapists spend most of their time on impairment remediation and basic ADLs, missing critical community and social participation opportunities. This workshop will focus on how to promote and support participation in context in everyday OT practice. We will explore participation assessments that could be used by OTs to evaluate participation needs, issues and outcomes. Along with assessments, we’ll explore an evidence-based, community-focused participation intervention that combines occupational therapy and self management theories to increase participation, emotional and physical health outcomes of adults with long term disabilities. You will try out several self management strategies you could use in your own OT practice. In the second part of the workshop, we will give an overview of civil rights globally and in Singapore, and share strategies for working on self advocacy and community capacity building related to increasing full participation of people with disabilities in society. You will also develop your own action plan for changing your own practice to meet the participation needs of people with disabilities.

Learning Objectives:
At the completion of the workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Identify how to assess participation in context from a consumer-directed perspective, and evaluate which assessments might work best in your OT practice.
  2. Describe key elements and the theory bases behind an evidence-based participation intervention.
  3. Practice using self management strategies to improve participation.
  4. Identify key civil rights related to participation of people with disabilities globally, and key strategies for increasing self advocacy and community empowerment with disability communities.
  5. Action plan how you will incorporate participation in context into your everyday OT practice.

Education Approach:
Teaching methods used in this workshop include short lectures supported by Powerpoint, social learning problem solving activities with peers, case studies, and action planning.

Practice Implications:
We now have compelling evidence that points to the importance of social participation, and its potential impact on emotional and physical health, but in order to work on participation, occupational therapists need to know how about participation civil rights and self advocacy, assessment and community-based intervention strategies. This workshop will focus on promoting participation in context and the potential role and impact of occupational therapy in doing so, including expansion of roles into community-based settings.


 

 

 

 

 

 
Workshop 3 Assistive Technology (AT): Considerations for Assessment and Implementation Process for Persons with Disabilities in Singapore
Presenters: Mr Tan Chuan Hoh, Ms Chia Rui Min & Ms Siti Juliana Binte Mohamed Ruslan Hadi
19 October 2018, Friday

Assistive Technology (AT) is an essential component of success for persons with disabilities in performing activities of daily living and pursuing various life roles. Assessing and implementing AT requires a match between the client’s abilities, skills and the right AT tools. In this workshop, Joy Zabala’s SETT Framework (Student-Environment-Task-Tool) and Cook and Hussey’s HAAT model (Human-Activity-Assistive Technology) will be used to guide clinicians in data gathering and decision making within the assessment and implementation process. This workshop will provide participants with a fresh perspective on the comparison of the frameworks when considering the application of AT with persons with disabilities. Case studies focusing on the application of computer access and environment control will also be used to demonstrate the application of AT within various clinical settings.

Learning Objectives:
By the end of the 1 day workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. To provide participants with an understanding of AT frameworks that guide the process of AT assessment and implementation in the local context (application of SETT Framework/HATT Model)
  2. To provide participants with AT knowledge and skills that are required for AT assessment and implementation
  3. To provide participants with an understanding of local challenges and possible resources for AT tools
  4. To increase participants’ confidence in their AT skills

Educational Approach/Pedagogy:

  • Presentations
  • Case study
  • Group work

Practice Implications:

  1. Clinicians will be able to apply assistive technology frameworks within their clinical setting
  2. Clinicians will be equipped with basic knowledge and considerations when assessing client for assistive technology application and implementation within the local context
  3. Clinicians will be equipped with AT tools and resources for AT applications such as computer access and ECU

 

 

 

 

 

 
Session 4 Getting the most from the Sensory Profile*
Ms Melinda Cooper
20 October 2018, Saturday

This workshop will provide an overview of Dunn’s sensory processing framework and its relationship to the Sensory Profile for both adults and children.  We will discuss administration, scoring and interpretation of the Sensory Profile with an emphasis on how the results may be used to guide clinical reasoning and problem solving for clients with sensory processing challenges affecting participation in activities of daily living.

Learning Objectives:
At the completion of the workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the four quadrants of Dunn’s sensory processing framework
  2. Understand the ways in which high and low sensory threshold patterns may manifest in everyday life
  3. Understand where the Sensory Profile fits within a Person, Environment and Occupation model, and how the interaction of these elements relates to both the assessment and intervention processes
  4. Write and test a sensory hypothesis
  5. Apply the Sensory Profile to client case studies of different ages and diagnostic groups
  6. Understand a basic format and philosophy for reporting the results of sensory assessment

Education Approach:
Verbal presentation supported by Powerpoint, whole-group discussion and problem solving, small group case studies.

Practice Implications:
The Sensory Profile is used by occupational therapists around the world, however it is a complex measure that functions differently to most other standardised assessments. In order to use the tool effectively and obtain maximal benefit from the data it provides, therapists must have a good understanding of the underlying theory and how results can be used to enhance performance and participation. This workshop is designed for therapists who currently use, or are likely to use, the Sensory Profile and who want to ensure that they are applying a best practice approach to their sensory assessments.

* This session is sponsored by Pearson Clinical and Talent Assessment